Pozzuoli

THEATRES AND AMPHITEATRES INTO THE ROMAN CAMPANIA . THE “FLAVIUS AMPHITHEATRE” IN POZZUOLI: 1st PART.

This article about the “Flavius Amphiteatre” opens a series entitled “Theatres and Amphtheatres into the Roman Campania”. All pictures were made upon permission by the Superintendence to the Archaeological Heritage n. 10793 of 10th July 2014, with the exception of the first two.

Picture 1. Greek theatre of Epidaurus.

Picture 1. Greek theatre of Epidaurus.

In this series I’ll not follow a strictly chronological order. I’ll begin to treat this subject from the most famous monuments, such as the amphitheatres of Pozzuoli and Santa Maria Capua Vetere, to the less known – but not less fascinating – buildings, such as the theatre of Cales (Calvi Risorta near Caserta) and the one of Villa Pausylipon in Naples. What distinguishes an amphitheatre from a theatre? As a first step I have to clear up this point: the Roman amphitheatre is an evolution of the Greek theatre, whose quite semicircular plan didn’t change from the Greek era to the 1st century AD, as attested by the Great Theatre and the Small Theatre (or Odèion) in Pompeii, built in 2nd century b. C., and subsequently modified. At this purpose, we could compare the plan of the Greek theatre in Epidaurus (picture 1), with the one of the “Flavius Amphitheatre” in Pozzuoli (picture 2).

The invention of the amphitheatre led to an evolution of the Greek theatre in a monumental sense. The same word “amphitheatre” comes from the Greek term amphìtheatron, composed by amphì (around, on every side) and theatron (theatre). As a matter of fact, the amphitheatre originated from the contraposition of two theatres, giving to the strucuture an elliptical shape. Unlike the theatre, the amphitheatre took advantage of the natural slope of the grounds to support the cavea, which usually rested on solid bulkheads. The amphitheatres were quite always located in level places. The tiers of seats were divided vertically in four sections called “wedges” (in latin cunei), and orizontally in three sectors (praecinctiones). Each of those sectors was bound to a single class. These areas were called ima, media and summa cavea (lower, middle and higher tiers of seats). Senators could reach the lower tiers of seats (ima cavea), which sometimes could include an Authority box. The members of the equestrian class (from eques, pl. equites, a social rank whose power derived from his own wealth) could reach the media cavea (middle tiers of seats). People could reach the higher tiers of seats (summa cavea), farthest from bullring. These three sectors sometimes were overhung by a porch with columns, delimited outwards by a wall. The Flavius Amphiteatre could lodge 40.000 spectators about, and its cavea included 39 steps: 8 in the ima cavea; 16 in the media cavea; and 15 in the summa cavea. The Romans extended this division also to theatres. In fact, into the Odeon – or Small Theatre – in Pompeii, the distinction between ima and media cavea is marked by two marble balustrades decorated with winged gryphons. There’s another difference between a theatre and an amphitheatre: while in theatres the entrances were usually two, placed beside the scene, in amphitheatres the number of entrances increases. The Flavius Amphitheatre in Pozzuoli had sixteen entrances: the four main accesses, in connection with the four cardinal points, placed at the end of the middle axes of the ellipse, were preceded by a monumental porch with pillars (propylon), divided in three naves which, through many arches, allowed to enter the arena (pics 3, 4 and 5). The porch preceding the southern entrance seems to be very imposing (pic 3). At the end of this porch two stairs, placed beside the arches, led to the Authorities Gallery (pic 4).

Foto 3: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, portico monumentale (propylon) sul lato meridionale.

Picture 3: Pozzuoli, Flavius Amphitheatre, monumental porch (propylon) along the southern side.

 

Foto 4: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, cavea meridionale con palco per l'autorità

Picture 4: Pozzuoli, Flavius Amphitheatre, tiers of seats on the southern side, with the authority box.

 

Foto 5: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, portico monumentale (propylon) dell'ingresso orientale.

Picture 5: Flavius Amphitheatre, monumental porch on the eastern side

Two corridors – or ambulatories – run under tiers of seats, connecting each other the four entrances (pics 6 and 7). Other twenty stairs (vomitoria) led from the ambultories to the middle tiers of seats and the overhanging porch (pic 8).

 

Foto 6: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare sottostante la cavea meridionale.

Picture 6: Pozzuoli, Flavius Amphitheatre, ambulatory ring below the southern cavea .

 

Foto 7: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare sottostante la cavea settentrionale.

Picture 7: Pozzuoli, Flavius Amphitheatre, ambulatory ring below the northern cavea.

 

Foto 8: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, fiancata meridionale, scalinata di accesso (vomitorium) alla precinzione alta (summa cavea).

Picture 8: Pozzuoli, Flavius Amphitheatre, the southern side, stairway (vomitorium) to the high tiers of seats (summa cavea).

At this point we might ask the following questions: what kind of events could take place into an amphitheatre? And, most of all, what were their meaning and origin? From the passages of Gaius Valerius Martial that I’ll quote subsequently, we can get a first important datum: into the amphitheatres, ill-adapted to accommodate comedies or musical performances, could take place only scenic representations, sometimes inspired by classic mythology, that I’ll indicate with their latin names: the munera gladiatoria (gladiators fightings), the venationes (hunts), and the naumachiae (namely “naval battle”).

Referring to the last category, Martial wrote (De Spectaculis, 24):  “Whosoever you are, belated spectator coming from distant lands, which care for the first time in these sacred events, don’t be deceived by the naval battle with its fleets and the resemblance of these waves with the ones of the seas. You don’t believe it? Wait until the water is no longer haunted by the battle: time will go quickly and you’ll say: But here a little while ago there was the sea“. We have to imagine, therefore, great pipelines transporting large quantities of water, and sewerages to drain them. These events could not take place in Pozzuoli’s Amphiteatre, because probably it was deprived of the useful infrastructures. This conjecture, that Charles Dubois advanced for the first time in 1907, based on the presence of an acqueduct and a sewerage that cross the basement along the minor axis of the ellipse, was resolutely confuted by Amedeo Maiuri, with this statement of motives: “But giving naval battles in a region rich in gulfs, ports and lakes, could be a non – sense: and so the arena had its stable and monumental preparation for fightings and hunts” (MAIURI A., I Campi Flegrei. Dal sepolcro di Virgilio all’antro di Cuma, 1981, p. 51). The acqueduct and the underlying sewerage could not support the water flow necessary to set up a naval battle. Therefore, they were probably used to wash the arena and its basement; and to feed waterworks and fountains placed in various points of the building. The amphitheatre was equipped either with an highly branched waterworks, built with lead pipes; or with a system to drain rain water, with terracotta tubes and rain – pipes on the outer façades of pillars along the perimetric ambulatory. 

The word naumachia, however, indicated not only the mock battle itself, but also the place in which it could occur. Read what Suetonius says about the Emperors Augustus and Titus in two passages of his Lives of the Caesars: “…. and a naval battle, for which he ordered to dig the ground near the Tiber, where now is the Wood of Caesars” (Lives of the Caesars, II, 43 – the Roman numeral indicates the book, the Arabic number indicates the passage). And then: “He gave even a naval battle in the old Naumachia (as Naumachia we have to intend the structure that Augustus ordered to build near the Tiber’s bank, quoted in the previous passage), and gladiators fightings, and hunts with five thousands beasts of every species in one day” (Lives of the Caesars, VIII, 43). The Naumachia that i quoted in the passage II, 43 was probably covered with wooden planks, so that the “gladiators fightings” and the “hunts with five thousands beasts” could take place. Regarding gladiatorial fightings (munera gladiatoria) and hunts (venationes), some scholars have identified their origins among the Oscans, a pre – Roman population, where these events could be part of funerary rites. The same Dupont ascribes these events to the category of “rituals of separation”: «In spite of their evolution, the munera preserved some steady trait that allow us to reconstruct their religious and cultural meaning, that couldn’t always be a gift to some late relative. The same gesture that accompanied it, likened it to a human sacrifice offered to the powers of the Underworld, because the blood gushing out was given to dead, butbut the ones still alive didn’t take their part. Drinking blood, dead became anthropophagous, changing themselves into creatures unrelated to the world of gods and men, connected instead by an animal and vegetable sacrifice. The munus could be, therefore, a “ritual of separation”: according to the latin wording, calming down death could mean relegate them into a different space, into an absolutely savage dimension” (F. DUPONT, Gli spettacoli, in A. GIARDINA (edit. by), Roma antica, Roma – Bari 2008, pp. 282 – 306).

The first munus of which we have some information, was probably organized in Rome in 364 BC, by Junius Brutus in memory of his dead father. Just over following centuries gladiatorial fighitings assumed an “official dress”, preserving at the same time their memorial meaning. In 164 BC Lucius Aemilius Paulus set up in Amphipolis a munus to commemorate his victory in the battle of Pidna. These events, therefore, didn’t always take place into amphitheatres, most of all during the Republican age: from 216 BC on they were set up prevailingly into forums, the beating heart of political – administrative life of the city. In order to indicate the different structures in which these events could take place, i could quote a passage by Suetonius, previously mentioned, but quoting it completely this time: “Accordingly to number, variety and magnificence of shows he was over his predecessors. He (Augustus) says that, on behalf of his own name, he organized public shows four times and twenty-three times in honour of magistrates that were absent or poor. Sometimes he set up some show in various neighborhoods, using actors speaking all languages; he set up shows not only in forum or amphitheatre, but also in circus or polling stations, and sometimes they were only huntings; he organized also wrestling contests with athletes into the Field of Mars, where wooden benches were placed, and a naval battle, for which he ordered to dig the ground near the Tiber, where now is the Wood of Caesars” (Lives of the Caesars, II, 43). 

The venationes (hunts) had their ritual worth as well. Simulating a hunt, they could consist either in fightings between a beast and a gladiator or between two beasts: with the emperor Tiberius (14 – 37 AD), these hunts became part of munera gladiatoria (gladiator fightings). Only literature could make relive fears, excitement and feelings of gladiators and spectators, protagonists and witnesses of a cruel show. Quoting again Martial: “A tiger born between the mountains of Ircania, which was a rare specimen, accustomed to lick the hand of his tamer who entrusted it to her safely, with rabid fangs cruelly mangled a wild lion: a never seen victory, of which there’s no record over centuries. She would never dare such a bravery, as long as she lived in thick woods; after her coming between us, increased her fierceness” (De Spectaculis, 18). And then: “The hand of the strong and still young Carpophorus sticks his Noriker spears with safe blows. He brought a pair of steers on his neck without effort; he defeated a furious buffalo and a bison; escaping from him, a lion threw himself on the spears. Come on people, try now to grouse about the lenghty delays” (De Spectaculis, 23).

Several reasons led to build the Flavius Amphitheatre in Pozzuoli. We could find whether practical, or political and social reasons. Regarding the first hypothesis, the amphitheatre was built next to another one smaller and older, dating back to the 1st century BC, between the end of Republican Age and the beginning of Augustus Principate (27 BC), placed on north – east side, next to the bridge of the railway Naples – Rome, whose building led to its discovery. During the Principate of Augustus, Pozzuoli became a cosmopolite town, important enough to accomodate merchant colonies coming from all Mediterranean shores (an altar dedicated to Dusares, discovered into the sea, led to spot a colony of Nabatean merchants, coming from Jordan), the older amphitheatre became at once unsuited to contain such a big and variegated audience. Tells Suetonius: “The most comprehensive confusion and disorder reigned in performances; Augustus introduced order and discipline, urged by the insult that a senator suffered when in Pozzuoli, at the time of games to which everyone rushed, nobody received him, among many spectators. Induced therefore the Senate to decree that, during public performances, offered anywhere, the first tier of seats had to be reserved to Senators …….”. This amphitheatre was active until the 1st century AD, according to what Cassius Dio tells about it into the most argued passage of his Historia Romana, come down to us through the version that the Byzantine monk Xyphilinus drew up in 11th century. The author in fact describes the games organized in Pozzuoli in 66 AD by Patrobius, a freedman of the emperor Nero, in honour of Tiridates – brother of Vologeses, king of Parthians – who was about to receive, from the hands of the same Nero, the crown of kingdom of Armenia. On this occasion, was set up a venatio, during which Tiridates – in order to flaunt his deftness – from the same platform where he sat, killed two bulls piercing them with arrows” (Cassius Dio, Historia romana, LXIII, 3). Regarding the politic and social reasons, the Flavius Amphitheatre was built during an historical period characterized by serious tensions and civil wars. In the short span of a year, three different emperors succeded one other at the power: Galba, Oto and Vitellius. Two of them were murdered, and one – Oto – committed a suicide. Appointed as emperor by troops established in Judea, Titus Flavius Vespasian contended the power with his predecessor Vitellius, with the support of some cities, such as Pozzuoli that was rewarded with the assignment of some possessions of the nearby Capua, allied with the antagonist. The enhancement of its possessions probably increased the revenues of its Treasury, so that the city was able to complete the amphitheatre, according to what is testified by the marble tablets formerly placed upon the main entrances – and perhaps on some of secondary accesses – bearing engraved this inscription: COLONIA FLAVIA AUGUSTA / PUTEOLANA PECUNIA SUA. In this way the city wanted to pay homage changing simultaneously its toponym from COLONIA NERONIANA to COLONIA FLAVIA AUGUSTA PUTEOLANA.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

F. DEMMA, Monumenti pubblici di Puteoli. Per un’Archeologia dell’Architettura, Roma 2007.

F. DUPONT, Gli spettacoli, in A. GIARDINA (a cura di), Roma antica, Roma – Bari 2000, pp. 281 – 306.

 S. DE CARO, I Campi Flegrei, Ischia, Vivara. Storia e archeologia, Napoli 2004.

A. MAIURI, I Campi Flegrei. Dal sepolcro di Virgilio all’antro di Cuma, Roma.

MARZIALE, Gli spettacoli, Roma 1969.

SVETONIO, Le vite dei Cesari. Volume secondo. Libri IV – VIII, Torino 2008.

Per i brani tratti dalla “Vita di Augusto” (SVETONIO, Vita dei Cesari, II), mi sono avvalso della traduzione curata dalla Prof. Maria Rosa Orrù:http://professoressaorru.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/svetonio_xiicesari.pdf. Blog:http://professoressaorru.wordpress.com/.

CH. DUBOIS, Puzzoules antique. Histoire et topographie, Paris 1907.

Stefania De Francesco, 13 settembre 2014 presso il Complesso “Damiani” a Pozzuoli.

Molti di voi la ricorderanno nella serie “Un posto al sole” nel ruolo di Katia. Stefania De Francesco ha anche splendidamente interpretato ruoli da protagonista in spettacoli come “C’era una volta Scugnizzi”, musical di Claudio Mattone con Sal da Vinci, oppure “Ritratto di un divo”, con il tenore Gianluca Terranova, per la regia di Massimo Ranieri. Sabato 13 settembre 2014, alle ore 21, 30 Stefania De Francesco si esibirà in un recital unplugged presso il complesso “I Damiani” in via Montenuovo Licola Patria 85 a Pozzuoli. Stefania De Francesco recita, balla e soprattutto canta. Potrete in questo modo apprezzare a pieno il talento cristallino di un’artista a tutto tondo. Per raggiungere il complesso “I Damiani”, coloro che provengono da Napoli possono percorrere la Tangenziale A56 fino allo svincolo di Arco Felice. Il complesso è situato al termine dello svincolo, immediatamente sulla destra. Coloro che provengono dalla provincia di Caserta, possono percorrere la strada statale 7 quater fino allo svincolo Lago d’Averno. All’altezza della rotonda posta al termine dello svincolo, imboccare la terza strada (via Montenuovo, per l’appunto), e dopo circa 400 metri troverete il complesso “I Damiani” sulla destra.

È gradita la prenotazione: 081.8042666.

Anfiteatro Flavio. Parte seconda: i sotterranei.

Per la prima parte dell’articolo, clicca qui: http://wp.me/p4swij-2r.

Cari amici vicini e lontani, come promesso ecco la seconda parte dell’articolo sull’Anfiteatro Flavio di Pozzuoli. Anche in questo caso tutte le foto, tranne la prima, sono state su eseguite su autorizzazione della Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli n. 10793 del 10/07/2014.

Gli anfiteatri, diversamente dai teatri, disponevano anche di ambienti di servizio atti ad ospitare le gabbie delle fiere, i gladiatori, i macchinari, le scenografie. A differenza degli anfiteatri più antichi – come quelli di Pompei, Cuma, Teano, Nola o Liternum – dove tali ambienti erano dislocati al di sotto della cavea, l’anfiteatro di Pozzuoli dispone di sotterranei, in quanto questi spazi furono funzionalmente ricavati al di sotto dell’arena (foto 1). 

Foto 1: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, pianta dei sotterranei.

Foto 1: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, pianta dei sotterranei.

I sotterranei replicano in pianta l’assetto strutturale dell’arena. Due ambulacri che si incrociano perpendicolarmente al centro, posti in corrispondenza degli assi minore e maggiore dell’arena, sono iscritti in un’ellisse, il cui perimetro coincide con l’ambulacro che corre tutt’intorno (foto 14). Tra i due ambulacri centrali e quello perimetrale, altri ambienti disposti simmetricamente in sequenza danno origine ad altri quattro passaggi intermedi – due per lato – cui si accede attraverso archi a tutto sesto (foto 2 e 3).

Foto 2: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, corridoi di disimpegno tra l'ambulacro longitudinale e quello meridionale, visti da est.

Foto 2: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, corridoi di disimpegno tra l’ambulacro longitudinale e quello meridionale, visti da est (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli).

Foto 16: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, corridoi rettilinei intermedi, visti dall'ingresso occidentale.

Foto 3: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, corridoi rettilinei intermedi, visti dall’ingresso occidentale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

 

Ai sotterranei si giungeva, oltre che da diverse scalette di servizio, anche tramite due ingressi, posti presso i varchi est e ovest dell’arena, in corrispondenza dei quali due ambienti absidati accoglievano fontane per le abluzioni di gladiatori ed animali

 

 

Foto 4: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, accesso ai sotterranei dal lato occidentale.

Foto 4: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, accesso ai sotterranei dal lato occidentale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Foto 5: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, nicchia sulla parete meridionale dell'ingresso occidentale.-001

Foto 5: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, nicchia sulla parete meridionale dell’ingresso occidentale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Oltrepassato l’ingresso, si può ammirare la complessa articolazione architettonica dell’ambiente. L’ambulacro centrale maggiore, detto anche media via, posto in corrispondenza della lunga fossa rettangolare centrale, serviva alla movimentazione dei macchinari e delle scenografie (foto 5). Nelle murature prevale l’opera laterizia, mentre l’opera reticolata contraddistingue le pareti di fondo delle cellae, ossia i piccoli ambienti destinati ad ospitare le gabbie.

Foto 19: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, corridoio centrale con apertura rettangolare per l'installazione delle scenografie.

Foto 5: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, corridoio centrale con apertura rettangolare per l’installazione delle scenografie (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Ai lati dell’ingresso, si snodano l’ambulacro perimetrale settentrionale e quello meridionale, sulle cui pareti arcate a tutto sesto consentono di accedere a diversi ambienti posti su due livelli (foto 6 e 7).

Foto 6: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro settentrionale visto dall'ingresso occidentale.

Foto 6: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro settentrionale visto dall’ingresso occidentale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Foto 7: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro meridionale visto da est.

Foto 7: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro meridionale visto da est (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

All’inizio di ogni ambulacro due ambienti di servizio consentivano di accedere tramite scalette ad un corridoio, largo poco più di un metro, utilizzato forse dagli inservienti per accedere agli ambienti del secondo livello, dove erano custodite le gabbie per le le fiere (foto 8 e 9).

 

Foto 8: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, ambulacro meridionale, ambiente con scala di servizio.

Foto 8: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, ambulacro meridionale, ambiente con scala di servizio (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Foto 9: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, ambulacro settentrionale, ambiente con scala di servizio nei pressi dell'ingresso orientale.

Foto 9: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, ambulacro settentrionale, ambiente con scala di servizio nei pressi dell’ingresso orientale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Ricavate nelle volte degli ambulacri (foto 6 e 7) – alcune botole, una settantina circa – attraverso un complesso sistema composto da assi in legno, catene, carrucole e ganci, consentivano un rapido sollevamento delle gabbie dai sotterranei alla platea. Il sistema fu perfettamente ricostruito da Charles Dubois in un suo saggio del 1907 (foto 10). Gli inservienti spingevano le gabbie sotto le botole, affinchè potessero essere agganciate e trainate in superficie. Al secondo livello, per compiere tale operazione si adoperavano tavole in legno poggianti sulle mensole in basalto, ancora oggi innestate nella muratura. Completata l’operazione, si azionava un asse di legno che – infisso nella muratura della ima cavea, dotato di pali di sostegno e di un braccio basculante con carrucola, catena e gancio – sollevava la gabbia per consentire all’animale, al gladiatore o all’attore di entrare direttamente in scena. Si chiudeva infine la botola con una robusta tavola in legno di quercia.

 

Foto 10: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sistema di sollevamento delle gabbie (da Dubois, 1907).

Foto 10: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sistema di sollevamento delle gabbie (da Dubois, 1907).

Alcuni ambienti preservano ancora nelle volte di copertura i fori di alloggiamento per i pali di sostegno (foto 11).

Foto 11: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, volta di un ambiente adell'ambulacro settentrionale con i fori di alloggiamento per i pali di sostegno del sistema di sollevamento delle gabbie.

Foto 11: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, volta di un ambiente dell’ambulacro settentrionale con i fori di alloggiamento per i pali di sostegno del sistema di sollevamento delle gabbie (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

 

Lungo le pareti dei sotterranei è possibile rilevare altre tracce di questo sistema (foto 12).

DIGITAL CAMERA

Foto 12: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, sotterranei, parete settentrionale dell’ambulacro anulare meridionale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Questo complesso sistema di sollevamento era probabilmente nascosto alla vista del pubblico tramite le scenografie. Questa ipotesi trova conforto sia nella posizione centrale della grande apertura rettangolare adoperata per il loro allestimento; sia nelle fonti letterarie. Narra infatti Marziale (De Spectaculis, 21 b – il numero indica il passo): «Ci meravigliamo che la terra abbia cacciato fuori da una fessura improvvisamente apertasi Orfeo rivolto all’indietro; veniva da Euridice». Possiamo quindi immaginare lo stupore e la meraviglia che questi effetti scenici generavano nel pubblico, ignaro del complesso meccanismo che la scenografia occultava alla loro vista. O ancora (De Spectaculis, 21): «L’arena ti ha offerto lo spettacolo, o imperatore, di tutto quello che, secondo la fama, il monte Rodope vide sullo scenario ove agiva Orfeo. Strisciarono le rupi, corsero le foreste stupende come si narra fosse il bosco delle, Esperidi. C’era ogni tipo di bestie feroci mescolato al bestiame domestico e si librarono uccelli sopra il poeta, che tuttavia cadde dilaniato da un orso insensibile. Questa leggenda, prima d’ora veduta in pittura, è stata in questo modo realizzata». Altri scrittori, al pari di Marziale, parlano di tigri o orsi che fuoriescono da caverne; oppure dei gladiatori che, muovendosi analogamente, dovevano affrontarli.

Il prossimo articolo sarà sul teatro di “Villa Pausylipon” a Napoli.

BIBLIOGRAFIA ESSENZIALE:

F. DEMMA, Monumenti pubblici di Puteoli. Per un’Archeologia dell’Architettura, Roma 2007.

F. DUPONT, Gli spettacoli, in A. GIARDINA (a cura di), Roma antica, Roma – Bari 2000, pp. 281 – 306.

 S. DE CARO, I Campi Flegrei, Ischia, Vivara. Storia e archeologia, Napoli 2004.

A. MAIURI, I Campi Flegrei. Dal sepolcro di Virgilio all’antro di Cuma, Roma.

MARZIALE, Gli spettacoli, Roma 1969.

SVETONIO, Le vite dei Cesari. Volume secondo. Libri IV – VIII, Torino 2008.

Per i brani tratti dalla “Vita di Augusto” (SVETONIO, Vita dei Cesari, II), mi sono avvalso della traduzione curata dalla Prof. Maria Rosa Orrù: http://professoressaorru.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/svetonio_xiicesari.pdf. Blog: http://professoressaorru.wordpress.com/.

CH. DUBOIS, Puzzoules antique. Histoire et topographie, Paris 1907.

TEATRI E ANFITEATRI NELLA CAMPANIA FELIX. L’ANFITEATRO FLAVIO DI POZZUOLI

Questo articolo, dedicato all’Anfiteatro Flavio di Pozzuoli, è il primo di una serie intitolata “Teatri e anfiteatri nella Campania Felix”. Le foto del presente articolo, tranne le prime due, sono state eseguite su autorizzazione della Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli n. 10793 del 10/07/2014. Nella stesura di questa serie non osserverò un rigoroso ordine cronologico, ma inizierò la trattazione dai monumenti più noti al grande pubblico, come gli anfiteatri di Pozzuoli e di Santa Maria Capua Vetere, per poi analizzare le strutture meno note – ma non per questo meno affascinanti – come i teatri di Cales (Calvi, presso Capua), e di “Villa Pausylipon” a Napoli. Sul piano strutturale, tuttavia, cosa distingue un teatro da un anfiteatro? In via preliminare, va chiarito un punto: l’anfiteatro romano non è altro che un’evoluzione del teatro, la cui pianta a semicerchio quasi perfetto resterà sostanzialmente invariata dall’età greca fino al I secolo d. C., come attestano il Teatro Grande e l’Odeon di Pompei, risalenti al II secolo a. C., e successivamente modificati. Per comprendere fino a che punto i Romani si siano spinti nell’inventare la nuova tipologia architettonica dell’anfiteatro, potremmo confrontare la pianta ideale del Teatro greco di Epidauro (foto 1), con quella dell’Anfiteatro Flavio di Pozzuoli (foto 2).

Foto 1. Teatro Greco.

Foto 1. Teatro Greco di Epidauro.

Foto 2: Anfiteatro Flavio di Pozzuoli (da DEMMA F., 2007).

Foto 2: Anfiteatro Flavio di Pozzuoli (da DEMMA F., 2007).

Numerose sono le testimonianze letterarie al riguardo. Marco Valerio Marziale, nel poema “De Spectaculis”, descrive nel dettaglio il pubblico degli anfiteatri (De Spectaculis, III): “C’è una nazione tanto remota, tanto straniera, dalla quale gli abitanti non vengano nella tua città, o imperatore, a vedere gli spettacoli? Viene il tracio agricoltore dall’Emo, fiume d’Orfeo; viene il Sarmata, che si nutre col sangue del suo cavallo; viene quegli che l’onda dell’estremo mare colpisce; è accorso l’Arabo, sono accorsi i Sabei; e i Cilici vengono quì aspersi dello zafferano che essi producono. Sono venuti i Sigambri, con le trecce dei cavalli annodati, e gli Etiopi coi capelli intrecciati in altra foggia. Ogni popolazione parla una lingua diversa, ma tutte concordano in una sola, quando ti salutano vero padre della patria”. Gli Etiopi compariranno anche in un passo della Storia romana di Dione Cassio avvenuto proprio a Pozzuoli, cui farò riferimento di seguito.

Con l’invenzione dell’anfiteatro si assiste ad un’evoluzione in senso monumentale del teatro classico. Lo stesso vocabolo “anfiteatro” deriva dal greco amphithèatron composto da amphì, cioè “d’intorno, da ogni parte” e thèatron, ossia “teatro”. Il termine alluderebbe quindi ad una struttura che si sviluppa intorno ad un determinato punto. L’anfiteatro, infatti, nasce dalla contrapposizione di due teatri, che conferisce all’intera struttura una forma ellittica. A differenza del teatro, inoltre l’anfiteatro talvolta non sfruttava il pendio delle alture in funzione di sostegno della cavea, la quale poggiava invece su solide fondamenta in muratura. La cavea era suddivisa verticalmente in quattro cunei, e orizzontalmente in tre settori detti “precinzioni”, sovrapposti nel senso dell’altezza e destinati a diverse classi sociali. Queste precinzioni erano denominate ima, media summa cavea. Alla ima cavea, che poteva ospitare anche la tribuna per le autorità, potevano accedere solo i personaggi di rango senatoriale; alla media cavea i membri di rango equestre (dal latino eques, pl. equites, ossia “cavalieri”, ceto sociale il cui potere era legato al proprio censo); mentre la summa cavea – la più alta, e quindi più lontana dall’arena – era invece riservata al popolo. Nel caso dell’Anfiteatro Flavio di Pozzuoli la cavea, che poteva ospitare fino a 40.000 spettatori, si componeva di 39 gradini: otto nella ima cavea, sedici in quella media, e quindici nella summa cavea. Questa distinzione in precinzioni sarà estesa dai Romani anche ai teatri. Nell’Odeon – o Teatro Piccolo – di Pompei, il passaggio dalla ima cavea – riservata alle massime autorità cittadine e caratterizzata dalla presenza di sedili in marmo detti bisellia – alla media cavea, era contrassegnato dalla collocazione, accanto agli ingressi, di due transenne marmoree le cui terminazioni presentano figure di grifoni. Le tre precinzioni erano talvolta sovrastate da un atrio porticato con colonne detto porticus in summa cavea crypta, delimitato verso l’esterno da un muro. Nello stesso tempo, mentre nel teatro gli accessi erano quasi sempre due, solitamente dislocati ai lati della scena (come nel Teatro Grande e nell’Odeon di Pompei), nell’anfiteatro le vie di accesso si moltiplicano, anche in virtù delle distinzioni di classe. Nel caso dell’Anfiteatro Flavio di Pozzuoli gli accessi erano 16: i quattro principali, posti in corrispondenza dei punti cardinali e al termine degli assi mediani dell’ellisse, erano preceduti da un portico monumentale su pilastri – detto propylon – diviso in tre navate, che tramite altrettanti archi consentiva l’accesso diretto all’arena (foto 3, 4 e 5). Particolarmente imponente è il propylon dell’ingresso meridionale (foto 3), che si apre al di sotto della tribuna riservata alle autorità (foto 4), che preserva intatte le tre arcate.

Foto 3: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, portico monumentale (propylon) sul lato meridionale.

Foto 3: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, portico monumentale (propylon) sul lato meridionale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Foto 4: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, cavea meridionale con palco per l'autorità

Foto 4: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, cavea meridionale con palco per l’autorità (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli)

Foto 5: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, portico monumentale (propylon) dell'ingresso orientale.

Foto 5: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, portico monumentale (propylon) dell’ingresso orientale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

In corrispondenza dei quattro ingressi principali, due corridoi coperti, o ambulacri (foto 6 e 7), posti al di sotto delle gradinate e in comunicazione con l’arena, collegavano i quattro ingressi. La presenza di due fontane poste all’inizio ha indotto gli studiosi, come il Maiuri, ad ipotizzare che in questi ambienti sostassero animali e gladiatori prima e, soprattutto, dopo lo spettacolo. Una scaletta posta accanto all’ambulacro settentrionale, conduceva al secondo livello dei sotterranei, dov’erano dislocate le gabbie per gli animali impiegati negli spettacoli. Più oltre altri due ambulacri coperti, larghi circa 2 metri, al di sotto della ima cavea ma non comunicanti con essa, fungevano forse da passaggi di servizio.

Foto 6: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare sottostante la cavea meridionale.

Foto 6: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare sottostante la cavea meridionale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Foto 8: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, fiancata meridionale, scalinata di accesso (vomitorium) alla precinzione alta (summa cavea).

Foto 8: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, fiancata meridionale, scalinata di accesso (vomitorium) alla precinzione alta (summa cavea) (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Foto 7: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare sottostante la cavea settentrionale.

Foto 7: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare sottostante la cavea settentrionale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Oltre a quelli principali vi erano altri dodici ingressi minori, tre per ogni settore, che tramite una serie di scalinate e di ambulacri posti ai piani superiori, consentivano l’accesso alla media cavea. Altre venti rampe di scale (vomitoria), collegavano gli ambulacri alla summa cavea e alla soprastante porticus (foto 8).

A differenza del teatro, l’anfiteatro svolgeva un ruolo che spesso andava ben oltre il mero spettacolo, accogliendo talvolta tra le sue arcate le sedi delle corporazioni professionali (scholae). Nel caso dell’Anfiteatro Flavio di Pozzuoli, alcune lapidi attestano la presenza, in ambienti appositamente ristrutturati e aperti lungo l’ambulacro perimetrale esterno, delle corporazioni degli scabilllarii (musici legati alle attività teatrali), e dei navicularii (armatori). Come vedremo meglio in seguito, proprio l’ambulacro anulare esterno reca maggiormente le tracce delle pesanti ristrutturazioni cui fu sottoposta l’intera struttura all’epoca dell’impero di Traiano e del suo successore Adriano, cioè nel periodo compreso tra il 98 ed il 138 d. C.

Foto 9: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare esterno visto dall'ingresso occidentale.

Foto 9: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare esterno visto dall’ingresso occidentale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Foto 10: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare esterno sul lato meridionale.

Foto 10: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, ambulacro anulare esterno sul lato meridionale (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

La dislocazione dei pilastri lungo l’ambulacro perimetrale esterno (foto 9 e 10) consente di ricostruire in che modo fosse articolata la “facciata” dell’edificio: tre ordini sovrapposti di arcate a tutto sesto, separati da cornici e sormontati dalla parete del sovrastante attico, con semicolonne sia sulla faccia esterna che su quella interna dei pilastri. Un’articolazione identica a quella del Colosseo. Queste semicolonne scomparvero con le ristrutturazioni del II secolo d. C., quando, al fine di prevenire eventuali crolli o lesioni alle strutture portanti, i pilastri furono racchiusi in una muratura in opera laterizia (opus latericium). Tali ristrutturazioni sono visibili anche in altre parti dell’edificio, in particolare sul lato meridionale. Il materiale costruttivo proviene da cave campane. Con buona probabilità, si pensò inizialmente di adoperare il travertino proveniente dalle cave del Monte Massico nella costruzione delle strutture in superficie (foto 12), mentre i tufelli (cubilia) dell’opus reticulatum, provengono dalle cave del vicino Monte Barbaro. La struttura, tuttavia, a distanza di un secolo, mostrò i primi segni di cedimento, al punto tale che nel corso della campagna di ristrutturazioni avviata nel II secolo d. C., durante l’impero di Traiano (98 – 117 d. C) o del suo successore Adriano (117 – 138 d, C.), si rese necessario porre in opera gli inserti in laterizio visibili nelle arcate (foto 12), e i semipilastri, anch’essi in laterizio, posti ai lati delle stesse. I danni furono tanto gravi che in alcuni casi fu necessario murare alcune arcate (foto 11), rinforzando i pilastri di sostegno. Prevale, tuttavia, nella struttura la presenza di murature in opera mista (opus mixtum – foto 13), cioè murature realizzate con diverse tecniche costruttive: opera reticolata, opera laterizia, talvolta con inserti di massi in basalto o travertino.

Foto 12: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, fiancata meridionale, piano inferiore, arcata murata in opera mista.

Foto 11: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, fiancata meridionale, piano inferiore, arcata murata in opera mista (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Foto 11: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, muratura in travertino del Monte Massico sul lato meridionale, databile alla prima fase costruttiva.

Foto 12: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, muratura in travertino del Monte Massico sul lato meridionale, databile alla prima fase costruttiva (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Foto 13: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, pilastro sinistro dell'ingresso orientale, muratura in opera mista (opus mixtum).

Foto 13: Pozzuoli, Anfiteatro Flavio, pilastro sinistro dell’ingresso orientale, muratura in opera mista (opus mixtum) (su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo – Soprintendenza Archeologica di Napoli).

Giunti a questo punto, potremmo quindi porci le seguenti domande: quali eventi potevano aver luogo negli anfiteatri? E soprattutto quali ne erano il senso e l’origine? Dai passi di Marziale che citerò possiamo ricavare un primo, importante dato: negli anfiteatri, poco adatti ad accogliere commedie o esibizioni musicali, potevano aver luogo rappresentazioni sceniche talvolta ispirate alla mitologia classica, che io indicherò con i loro nomi in latino: i munera gladiatoria (combattimenti tra gladiatori); le venationes (cacce); e le naumachiae (naumachie, ossia rappresentazioni di battaglie navali).

Riferendosi a quest’ultima categoria, Marziale scrisse (De Spectaculis, 24): «Chiunque tu sia, tardivo spettatore venuto da lontane contrade, che per il primo giorno assisti a questi spettacoli sacri, non t’inganni con le sue flotte questa battaglia navale e la somiglianza di queste onde con le onde dei mari; qui poco fa c’era la terra. Non lo credi? Attendi che le acque non siano più infestate dalla battaglia; passerà poco tempo e dirai: Ma qui poco fa c’era il mare”».Occorre quindi immaginare l’esistenza di condutture capaci di convogliare grandi quantità d’acqua, e di fognature idonee al loro smaltimento. Questi spettacoli non potevano aver luogo nel nostro anfiteatro, essendo l’edificio probabilmente privo delle infrastrutture tecniche necessarie al loro allestimento. Questa ipotesi, che Charles Dubois avanzò nel 1907, basandosi sulla presenza di un braccio di acquedotto che taglia trasversalmente i sotterranei in corrispondenza dell’asse minore dell’ellisse (foto 14), e di una conduttura fognaria sottostante, fu confutata con decisione da Amedeo Maiuri con questa motivazione: «Ma dare spettacoli di naumachie entro l’arena di un anfiteatro, in una regione ricca di golfi, di porti e di laghi, tutti più o meno scenograficamente disposti, era un non senso; e l’arena ebbe così nel II secolo il suo stabile e monumentale apprestamento per combattimenti e cacce di fiere» (da MAIURI A., I Campi Flegrei. Dal sepolcro di Virgilio all’antro di Cuma, 1981, p. 51). È probabile comunque che il braccio di acquedotto e la sottostante fognatura, non essendo idonei a supportare la portata d’acqua necessaria all’organizzazione di una naumachia, fossero adoperati per le ordinarie attività di pulizia, oltre che per alimentare gli impianti idrici e le numerose fontane poste in vari punti dell’edificio. L’anfiteatro disponeva comunque sia di un impianto idrico molto ramificato, con tubature in piombo (fistulae), adoperate per alimentare le fontane stesse; sia di un impianto di smaltimento delle acque piovane, con tubature in terraccotta e grondaie disposte lungo i pilastri dell’ambulacro perimetrale esterno.

Il termine naumachia, tuttavia, non indicava solo lo spettacolo in sè, ma anche lo spazio nel quale esso aveva luogo. Si legga quanto Svetonio dice a proposito degli imperatori Augusto e Tito in due passi delle sue Vite dei Cesari«….. e una battaglia navale, per la quale fece scavare il terreno nei pressi del Tevere, dove ora si trova il Bosco dei Cesari» (II, 43 – il numero romano indica il libro, mentre le cifre arabe si riferiscono al passo); o ancora «….. diede anche una battaglia navale nell’antica Naumachia (intendendo per Naumachia proprio la struttura che Augusto, fece edificare sulla riva del Tevere, citata nel passo precedente) e ivi pure combattimenti di gladiatori, e di cinquemila fiere di ogni specie in un solo giorno» (VIII, 7). La Naumachia citata al passo II, 43 fu probabilmente coperta con tavole di legno per consentire lo svolgimento tanto del «combattimento di gladiatori» quanto della caccia alle «cinquemila fiere».

Quanto ai munera gladiatoria e alle venationes, molti studiosi, come Florence Dupont, ne hanno individuato le origini tra gli Oschi, popolazione della Campania pre – romana, presso la quale i combattimenti gladiatorii e le cacce erano forse parte integrante di riti funerari. Tali spettacoli manterranno intatta questa natura rituale per tutto il periodo della storia romana. In età imperiale, ad esempio, Plinio il Giovane organizzò un munus per commemorare la moglie defunta. L’imperatore Adriano seguì la stessa strada quando volle commemorare la suocera. La stessa Dupont ascrive i munera e le venationes alla categoria dei «riti di separazione» «Nonostante la loro evoluzione, i munera conservarono alcune caratteristiche costanti che consentono di ricostruire il significato religioso e culturale che non era sempre un semplice omaggio reso a un familiare defunto. Il gesto stesso che lo accompagnava, lo assimilava ad un sacrificio umano offerto alle potenze infernali, in quanto il sangue che sgorgava veniva donato ai morti, senza che i vivi si prendessero la loro parte. I morti, bevendo il sangue, si trasformavano in antropofagi e, dunque, in creature al di fuori del mondo degli dei e degli uomini, che venivano uniti esclusivamente da un sacrificio animale o vegetale. Il munus sarebbe, dunque, un rituale di separazione: placare i defunti, secondo la formula latina, significava relegarli in uno spazio diverso, in una dimesnione assolutamente selvaggia» Il brano è tratto da F. DUPONT, Gli spettacoli, in A. GIARDINA (a cura di), Roma antica, Roma – Bari 2008, pp. 282 – 306). I primi munera di cui si ha memoria furono organizzati a Roma nel 364 a. C. da Giunio Bruto in memoria del padre defunto. Solo nei secoli i combattimenti gladiatorii assunsero una veste ufficiale, pur mantenendo il loro carattere commemorativo. Nel 164 a. C. Lucio Emilio Paolo organizzò ad Anfipoli un munus per commemorare la vittoria da lui conseguita nella battaglia di Pidna.

Questi combattimenti, tuttavia, non ebbero sempre luogo negli anfiteatri, soprattutto in età repubblicana: a partire dal 216 a. C. furono ambientati prevalentemente nei fori, il cuore pulsante della vita politico – amministrativa delle città. Al fine di indicare la varietà di ambientazioni in cui questi spettacoli potevano aver luogo, potrei far riferimento ad un passo di Svetonio, già precedentemente citato, ma riportandolo questa volta più per esteso: «Per numero, varietà e magnificenza di spettacoli superò tutti i suoi predecessori. Egli stesso (Augusto) dice che, a suo nome, celebrò giochi pubblici quattro volte e ventitrè volte per magistrati che erano assenti o mancavano di mezzi. Qualche volta ne celebrò anche nei differenti quartieri, con numerose scene, servendosi di attori che parlavano tutte le lingue; diede spettacoli non solo nel foro e nell’anfiteatro,ma anche nel circo e nei recinti per le elezioni e talvolta si trattava soltanto di battute di caccia; organizzò anche degli incontri di lotta tra atleti nel Campo di Marte, dove furono disposte anche panche di legno, e una battaglia navale, per la quale fece scavare il terreno nei pressi del Tevere, dove ora si trova il Bosco dei Cesari» (Vite dei Cesari, II, 43).

Anche le venationes avevano lo stesso valore rituale. Simulavano una caccia e consistevano in combattimenti sia tra un animale e un gladiatore, sia tra due animali; con l’impero di Tiberio (14 – 37 d. C.) entrarono a far parte dei munera gladiatoria. Solo le fonti letterarie possono far rivivere i timori, l’esaltazione, i sentimenti dei gladiatori e del pubblico, protagonisti e testimoni di uno spettacolo truculento. Citando Marziale: «Una tigre nata tra le montagne dell’Ircania, delle quali era un raro campione, abituata a leccare la mano del suo domatore che gliela affidava sicuro, con rabbiose zanne crudelmente dilaniò un feroce leone: una vittoria mai vista, di cui non si ha notizia nei secoli. Non avrebbe mai osato una prodezza simile, finché abitò nelle folte selve; dopo che venne fra noi, accrebbe la sua ferocia» (De Spectaculis, 18). O ancora: «La mano del forte e ancor giovane Carpoforo mette a segno gli spiedi norici con sicuri colpi. Portò un paio di giovenchi sul collo senza fatica; ha vinto un furente bufalo e un bisonte; per fuggirlo un leone si gettò a capofitto sulle lance. Orsù popolo, prova ora a lamentarti dei lunghi indugi» (De Spectaculis, 23).

Le ragioni che portarono alla costruzione dell’Anfiteatro Flavio di Pozzuoli sono diverso genere. Si possono cogliere tanto ragioni pratiche, quanto ragioni di natura politico – sociale, tutte strettamente tra loro correlate.

In relazione alla prima ipotesi, l’anfiteatro fu costruito accanto ad un altro più piccolo e più antico, databile al I secolo a. C., tra la fine dell’età repubblicana e l’inizio del Principato di Augusto (27 a. C.) collocato a nord – est, presso il ponte della Linea Ferroviaria Direttissima Napoli – Roma, la cui costruzione nel 1915 portò alla sua scoperta. In una città che con l’avvio del Principato di Augusto era divenuta oramai un centro cosmopolita, tanto importante da accogliere colonie di mercanti provenienti da tutto il Mediterraneo (il ritrovamento in mare di un altare dedicato a Dusares, ha permesso di individuare persino la presenza di una colonia di mercanti Nabatei, originari dell’attuale Giordania), il vecchio anfiteatro si rivelò ben presto inadatto ad accogliere un pubblico tanto grande quanto variegato. Racconta Svetonio: «Negli spettacoli regnavano la confusione ed il disordine più completi; Augusto vi introdusse l’ordine e la disciplina, spinto dall’affronto che aveva ricevuto un senatore quando a Pozzuoli, in occasione di giochi ai quali tutti accorrevano, non era stato ricevuto da nessuno, in mezzo a tanti spettatori. Fece dunque decretare dal Senato che, per tutta la durata degli spettacoli pubblici, offerti in qualsiasi luogo, la prima fila di panche doveva essere riservata ai Senatori …..». Questo anfiteatro rimase forse attivo per tutto il I secolo d. C., anche sulla base di quanto racconta Cassio Dione in un passo molto discusso della sua Historia romana, giunta a noi attraverso la versione che il monaco bizantino Xifilino redasse nell’Undicesimo secolo. L’autore infatti racconta dei giochi organizzati a Pozzuoli nel 66 d. C. da un liberto di Nerone, Patrobio, in onore di Tiridate, fratello del re dei Parti Vologese, in procinto di ricevere a Roma, dalle mani dello stesso Nerone, la corona del regno di Armenia. In questa occasione fu allestita una venatio, nel corso della quale Tiridate, per dare prova della sua destrezza, dallo stesso palco dove era seduto, uccise due tori infilzandoli con le frecce ( Cassio Dione, Historia romana, LXIII, 3).

Quanto alle ragioni di natura politico – sociale, l’Anfiteatro Flavio fu costruito in una fase storica segnata da gravissime tensioni e da guerre fratricide. La morte di Nerone, avvenuta l’11 giugno del 68 d. C., lasciò l’impero nella più assoluta instabilità politica. Nel breve volgere di un anno si susseguirono al potere tre diversi imperatori: Galba, Otone e Vitellio. Due imperatori assassinati ed uno, Otone, morto suicida. Eletto imperatore dalle truppe stanziate in Giudea, Tito Flavio Vespasiano contese il potere al suo predecessore Vitellio, anche grazie al sostegno di alcune città, tra le quali Pozzuoli, che fu ricompensata con la cessione di una parte del territorio della vicina Capua, alleatasi con l’avversario. Questa immissione di nuove terre incrementò probabilmente gli introiti dell’Erario puteolano, al punto tale che la città fu in grado di portare a compimento l’anfiteatro, secondo quanto attestano le lapidi un tempo collocate sugli ingressi principali – e forse anche su qualche entrata secondaria – che recitano testualmente: COLONIA FLAVIA AUGUSTA / PUTEOLANA PECUNIA SUA. In questo modo la città volle rendere omaggio all’imperatore, mutando contemporaneamente il suo toponimo da COLONIA NERONIANA in COLONIA FLAVIA AUGUSTA PUTEOLANA.

Per la seconda parte dell’articolo, clicca qui: http://wp.me/p4swij-2G.

BIBLIOGRAFIA ESSENZIALE:

F. DEMMA, Monumenti pubblici di Puteoli. Per un’Archeologia dell’Architettura, Roma 2007.

F. DUPONT, Gli spettacoli, in A. GIARDINA (a cura di), Roma antica, Roma – Bari 2000, pp. 281 – 306.

 S. DE CARO, I Campi Flegrei, Ischia, Vivara. Storia e archeologia, Napoli 2004.

A. MAIURI, I Campi Flegrei. Dal sepolcro di Virgilio all’antro di Cuma, Roma.

MARZIALE, Gli spettacoli, Roma 1969.

SVETONIO, Le vite dei Cesari. Volume secondo. Libri IV – VIII, Torino 2008.

Per i brani tratti dalla “Vita di Augusto” (SVETONIO, Vita dei Cesari, II), mi sono avvalso della traduzione curata dalla Prof. Maria Rosa Orrù: http://professoressaorru.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/svetonio_xiicesari.pdf. Blog: http://professoressaorru.wordpress.com/.

CH. DUBOIS, Puzzoules antique. Histoire et topographie, Paris 1907.