#valois

TRACES OF MIDDLE AGES ALONG VIA DEI TRIBUNALI IN THE OLD TOWN OF NAPLES

by

PAOLO GRAVINA

paologravina7@gmail.com

If you want to read a quite literal translation in italian, please click here: http://paologravina7.com/2014/12/01/tracce-di-medioevo-lungo-via-tribunali-nel-cuore-antico-di-napoli/.

Se vuoi leggere una traduzione quasi letterale in italiano, clicca qui: http://paologravina7.com/2014/12/01/tracce-di-medioevo-lungo-via-tribunali-nel-cuore-antico-di-napoli/.

Naples is like a book to skim through, where the history could be read page by page. Naples is a layering of facts and events, where the appearances could be deceiving. Churches and palaces were constantly restructured over centuries, due to changes in style related to taste and cultural instances of the ages that have passed through. Not by chance, many neapolitan churches, founded in the Middle Ages or Early Christian period, have completely lost their original appearance in order to be adapted to the canons of the Council of Trent during 16th century, assuming therefore a Baroque shape. These changes are evident along the path of Via dei Tribunali. At the beginning of the road, between Vico San Domenico and Piazza San Gaetano, four important monuments follow each other along both sides of the road. First of all we meet the Church of San Pietro a Majella, founded along with its monastery – which houses a famous conservatory – at the beginning of 14th century by Giovanni Pipino from Barletta, an important member of the court of King of Naples Charles 2nd d’Anjou. The church consists of a plan with three aisles, with a caisson ceiling on central nave, and cross vaultings on the side ones (photo 1), according to a scheme previously adopted in other prestigious buildings in Naples, such as the Basilica of San Domenico Maggiore. The aisles are divided by pillars with a rectangular section, and semi-columns on three sides which support the ribs of the vaults on the side naves.

Photo 1: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, plan (from C. BRUZELIUS, The stones of Naples: church building in Angevine Italy, 1266 – 1343, New Haven and London, 2004).

Photo 1: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, plan (from C. BRUZELIUS, The stones of Naples: church building in Angevine Italy, 1266 – 1343, New Haven and London, 2004).

Photo 2: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, the interior.

Photo 2: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, the interior.

The existence of a straight apse, rather than “Cistercian suggestions”, seems to be related to the narrowness of the space behind, due to the presence of Vico Storto San Pietro a Majella, a winding road that separates the church from the convent of San Domenico Maggiore. This alley coincides with the ancient path that, passing through the oldest defensive walls in correspondence with Porta Donnorso (a no more existing gate, mentioned in Medieval documents as “Porta de domino Ursitate”), joined the city to the port and the Angevin Castle, seat of the Royal court. The oldest evidences state that the church had smaller dimensions than the current ones. Its façade was in alignment with the bell tower, whose base contains one of the two portals, the only one preserving its original Gothic shape (photo 3).

Photo 3: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, eastern side with the bell tower.

Photo 3: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, eastern side with the bell tower.

The church probably had a square plan. Between 14th and 15th centuries the church underwent several renovations. Two chapels were added at the opposite ends of the transept (the Leonessa Chapel along the northern transept, and the Pipino Chapel along the southern transept). The aisles were prolonged moving forward the façade. In order to advance these renovations, the Duke of Calabria, Alfonso of Aragon, released the huge amount of 2000 ducats to persuade the Celestine friars of Santa Caterina a Formiello (a church near Capuana Gate, along the eastern side of the 15th century defensive walls, near Piazza Garibaldi) to move to San Pietro a Majella monastery, in order to enlarge his dwelling in the surroundings.

The church was restored in Baroque style around the middle of 17th century, when some chapels were transformed. At the same time were executed the façade’s portal (photo 4), commissioned by Giovanna Zunica, Princess of Conca; the main altar, realized by Pietro and Bartolomeo Ghetti on a design by Cosimo Fanzago (photo 5); and the caisson ceiling, a precious carving of gilded wood, realized by Neapolitan craftsmen on a project by the Carthusian architect Bonaventura Presti (photo 6).

Photo 4: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, façade.

Photo 4: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, façade.

Photo 5: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, the main altar realized by Pietro and Bartolomeo Ghetti on a design by Cosimo Fanzago.

Photo 5: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, the main altar realized by Pietro and Bartolomeo Ghetti on a design by Cosimo Fanzago (from Napoli Sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7).

Photo 6: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, caisson ceiling (from Napoli Sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7).

Photo 6: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, caisson ceiling (from Napoli Sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7).

The caisson ceiling is one of the brighter works of Baroque art in Naples. In fact holds paintings by Mattia Preti, depicting Scenes from the life of Pietro from Morrone (the Pope Celestine 5th), into the ceiling above the aisles (photo 7); and Scenes from the life of St. Catherine of Alexandria into the ceiling above the transept. These paintings date back to the period from 1657 to 1659.

Photo 7: Mattia Preti, “Celestine 5th takes into possession of the papal seat, preceded by Charles 2nd D'Anjou with the cross”, Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, painting in the caisson ceiling above the central aisle (from Napoli Sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7).

Photo 7: Mattia Preti, “Celestine 5th takes into possession of the papal seat, preceded by Charles 2nd D’Anjou with the cross”, Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, painting in the caisson ceiling above the central aisle (from Napoli Sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7).

The frescoes of the chapels Pipino and Leonessa, located at the opposite ends of the transept, could be counted among the best expressions of Neapolitan painting of the 14th century. The Leonessa chapel, the one at the northern end, still preserves a large of part of its frescoes dating back to the middle of 14th century, at the time of the first restructure of the building. These frescoes could be divided in two superimposed bands: the lower band, with a sequence of circles containing busts of Saints (photo 8); and the higher band with Scenes from the life of St. Martin.

Photo 8:  Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, Leonessa chapel, circle with the bust of the Magdalene.

Photo 8: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, Leonessa chapel, circle with the bust of the Magdalene.

Indeed, the star – sprangled sky decorating the cross vault holds circles with images of Saints and Doctors of Church.

The Pipino chapel – founded around the middle of 14th century by Giovanni Pipino, earl of Altamura and Minervino Murge, which died in 1356 (he should not be confused with the eponymous founder of the church) – opens on southern branch of the transept. This chapel holds a series of frescoes representing Scenes from the life of Christ of great stylistic quality. 

In this branch of the transept, between the first and second chapel, appears the image of the “Our Lady of Humility”, dating back to the middle of 14th century (photo 9).

Photo 9: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, Our Lady of the Humility.

Photo 9: Naples, church of San Pietro a Majella, Our Lady of the Humility.

From an architectural point of view, very interesting is the bell tower with five levels surmounted by a pyramidal spire (photo 3). It seems to reproduce, in its essential elements, the bell tower of the Cathedral in Lucera, a small town into the northern Apulia, near Foggia (http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilica_cattedrale_di_Santa_Maria_Assunta_%28Lucera%29). At this purpose, could be very interesting to notice that the same founder of the church, Giovanni Pipino from Barletta, was appointed by Charles 2nd d’Anjou to exterminate the Saracen colony that the emperor Frederick 2nd of Swabia installed just in Lucera, whose cathedral still represents one of the best preserved patterns of gothic architecture in Southern Italy. This cathedral was probably founded by the same King of Naples Charles 2nd d’Anjou.

Walking towards Piazza San Gaetano, on left side we’ll find one of the most important evidences of Renaissance architecture in Naples: the Pontano chapel (photo 10). The importance of this chapel is due to its artistic, architectural and literary elements. The building – founded in 1490 from the humanist Giovanni Pontano to hold the mortal remains of his wife Adriana Sassone, who died during that year – has a rectangular plan, aisleless and covered with a barrel vault. The chapel preserves, in its inner space, a rare maiolica tiled floor dating back to the end of 15th century, and a “Madonna and Child” frescoed by the local painter Franesco Cicino above the altar that was due to conserve the precious relic of Livy’s arm, according to the wishes of its founder Giovanni Pontano.

Photo 10: Naples, Pontano chapel, façade.

Photo 10: Naples, Pontano chapel, façade.

The boundary walls are decorated with frames and pilaster strips dividing the surface in a sequence of rectangular panels holding windows. Besides, every window is flanked by memorial tablets in greek and latin, dictated by the same Giovanni Pontano. The chapel, resting on an high base (or stylobate), has also a crypt. The 18th century writer Bernardo de Dominici, in his Vite de’ pittori, scultori e architetti napoletani (Lives of neapolitan painters, sculptors and architects) has attributed the plan to Andrea Ciccione (a fanciful character more than a real person). The scholar Roberto Pane indeed ascribed the chapel’s plan to Fra’ Giocondo da Verona. Afterwards the same scholar attributed the plan to the Tuscan architect Francesco di Giorgio Martini.

On the same widening in front of the chapel, raises the monumental façade of Santa Maria Maggiore alla Pietrasanta, rebuilt during 17th century on the same site of an Early Christian basilica founded in 6th century BC by Pomponius, bishop of Naples, of which remains no visible traces. The name is due to the presence of a stone with a carved cross, on which was placed an image of the Virgin. But the most interesting monument looking upon the widening is the bell tower dating back to 10th or 11th century, rare evidence of Romanesque architecture in Naples (photo 11).

Photo 11: Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower.

Photo 11: Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower

We could consider this building as a kind of “patchwork”, built with various elements dating back to the period from the Roman to the High Middle Ages: two columns (photos 12 and 13); an altar (photo 14); an architectural frieze (photo 15), and the fragment of a channelled column with trabeation (photo 16). Into the inner walls of the barrel arch at the base of the bell tower were placed some lava stones used to pave streets in Roman Ages (photo 17).

Photo 12:   Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, Roman column on the eastern side.

Photo 12: Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, Roman column on the eastern side.

Photo 13:  Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, Roman column on the western side.

Photo 13: Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, Roman column on the western side.

Photo 14:  Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, Roman altar.

Photo 14: Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, Roman altar.

Photo 15:  Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, architetural frieze from a Roman building.

Photo 15: Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, architetural frieze from a Roman building.

Photo 16: Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, fragment of a channelled column with trabeation.

Photo 16: Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, fragment of a channelled column with trabeation.

Photo 17:  Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, lava stones into the inner walls of the barrel arch.

Photo 17: Naples, church of Santa Maria della Pietrasanta, bell tower, lava stones into the inner walls of the barrel arch.

After few steps, crossing the intersection with via Nilo and via Atri, we can notice a trachyte – tuff arcade with lancet and barrel arches, the only trace of the “Palace of Philip D’Anjou” (photo 18) built by Philip D’Anjou – a member of the royal family of Naples, prince of Taranto and Emperor of the Eastern Latin Empire – at the time of his marriage with Catherine of Valois, daughter of the Latin Emperor Baldwin 2nd. Another trace is the marble portal with the coat of arms of the royal family at the top (photo 19). For those who want to deepen this subject, at the end of this article there’s a short bibliography.

Photo 18: Naples, Palace of Philip D'Anjou, arcade.

Photo 18: Naples, Palace of Philip D’Anjou, arcade.

Photo 19:   Naples, Palace of Philip D'Anjou, marble portal.

Photo 19: Naples, Palace of Philip D’Anjou, marble portal.

SHORT BIBLIOGRAPHY

V. REGINA, Napoli antica. Una splendida passeggiata tra i monumenti, le chiese, i palazzi, le strade, i luoghi perduti e le leggende popolari del centro antico di una città ricca di storia e di cultura, Roma 1994, pp. 124 – 134.

Napoli sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7, Napoli (2010).

P. L. DE CASTRIS, Arte di corte nella Napoli angioina, Firenze, Cantini 1986, pp. 408 – 447.

C. BRUZELIUS, The stones of Naples. Church Building in Angevin Italy, 1266 – 1343, New Haven and London, Yale University Press 2004.

Advertisements

Tracce di Medioevo lungo via Tribunali, nel cuore antico di Napoli.

Per una traduzione quasi letterale in inglese, clicca qui: http://wp.me/p4swij-5h.

If you want to read a quite literal translation in english, please click here: http://wp.me/p4swij-5h.

Napoli è come un libro da sfogliare, dove la storia si legge pagina per pagina e le tracce del passato si sovrappongono. Napoli è una stratificazione di fatti e vicende, dove l’apparenza inganna. Chiese e palazzi hanno costantemente subito ristrutturazioni e mutamenti di stile legati al gusto e alle istanze culturali delle epoche che hanno attraversato. Non a caso molte chiese napoletane fondate nel Medioevo o in età paleocristiana hanno del tutto perduto il loro aspetto originario per adeguarsi ai canoni emanati dal Concilio di Trento nel corso del Cinquecento, assumendo quindi una veste barocca. Queste trasformazioni risultano evidenti lungo via Tribunali. Nel tratto iniziale, compreso tra Vico San Pietro a Majella e piazza San Gaetano, si susseguono quattro monumenti di grande importanza per l’arte napoletana del Medioevo. Il primo di questi è la chiesa di San Pietro a Majella, fondata insieme al vicino convento – che attualmente ospita il noto conservatorio – all’inizio del Trecento da Giovanni Pipino da Barletta, importante personaggio di corte in quanto maestro razionale della Curia all’epoca di Carlo II d’Angiò. La chiesa consta di una pianta a tre navate, con tetto a capriate nella navata centrale e volte a crociera in quelle laterali (foto 1), secondo uno schema precedentemente adottato in altri prestigiosi edifici come San Domenico Maggiore. Le navate sono divise da pilastri a fascio a sezione rettangolare, con semi-colonne su tre lati che sorreggono i costoloni delle volte a crociera sulle navate laterali.

Napoli, San Pietro a Majella, pianta.

Foto 1: Napoli, San Pietro a Majella, pianta (da C. BRUZELIUS, Le pietre di Napoli. L’architettura religiosa nell’Italia angioina, 1266 – 1343, Roma 2005, p. 192).

Foto 2: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, interno.

Foto 2: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, interno.

La presenza di un’abside rettilinea, più che “a suggestioni cistercensi”, sembra essere legata alla ristrettezza dello spazio, dovuta alla presenza di Vico storto San Pietro a Majella – la tortuosa strada che separa la chiesa dal Convento di San Domenico Maggiore – e di Piazzetta Casanova, coincidenti con l’antico tracciato viario che, oltrepassando le antiche mura difensive in corrispondenza di Porta Donnorso (oggi non più esistente, ma nota alle fonti medievali come “Porta de domino Ursitate”), congiungeva il centro della città al porto e a Castel Nuovo (il “Maschio angioino”, residenza cittadina dei sovrani). Le più antiche testimonianze affermano che la chiesa avesse dimensioni ben più ridotte di quelle attuali, con la facciata allineata al campanile, alla cui base si apre uno dei due ingressi, l’unico ad aver conservato la struttura originaria.

Foto 2: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, lato orientale con campanile.

Foto 3: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, lato orientale con campanile.

La chiesa aveva forse pianta quadrata. Tra il Trecento ed il Quattrocento l’edificio subì una serie di trasformazioni che portarono ad un ampliamento del transetto con l’aggiunta di due cappelle alle estremità opposte (la cappella Leonessa a Nord, e la cappella Pipino a Sud), ed allo spostamento della facciata con l’allungamento delle navate. Per questi ultimi lavori, che interessarono anche il convento, Alfonso d’Aragona, Duca di Calabria, concesse l’ingente somma di duemila ducati per convincere i frati celestini di Santa Caterina a Formiello (presso Porta Capuana) a trasferirsi nel convento di San Pietro a Maiella affinché potesse ingrandire la propria dimora della Duchesca (quartiere posto nei pressi dell’odierna Piazza Garibaldi).

La chiesa fu poi ristrutturata in stile barocco intorno alla metà del Seicento, quando furono trasformate alcune cappelle, ed eseguiti il portale di facciata, realizzato su commissione della Principessa di Conca, Giovanna Zunica (foto 4); l’altare maggiore, opera di Pietro e Bartolomeo Ghetti, su disegno di Cosimo Fanzago (foto 5); ed il soffitto a cassettoni, un prezioso lavoro d’intaglio in legno dorato, realizzato da artigiani napoletani su progetto dell’architetto certosino Bonaventura Presti (foto 6).

Foto 5: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, facciata.

Foto 4: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, facciata.

Foto 5: Cosimo Fanzago, altare maggiore. Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro Maiella.

Foto 5: Cosimo Fanzago, altare maggiore. Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro Maiella (da Napoli Sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7).

Foto 6: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, soffitto a cassettoni.

Foto 6: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, soffitto a cassettoni (da Napoli Sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7).

Il soffitto rappresenta una delle più brillanti realizzazioni dell’arte barocca napoletana. Racchiude infatti le tele che Mattia Preti eseguì tra il 1657 ed il 1659, raffigurandovi soggetti ispirati alla vita di Pietro da Morrone (papa Celestino V) nella navata centrale (foto 7), e di Santa Caterina d’Alessandria, nel transetto.

Foto 7: Mattia Preti, "Celestino V prende possesso della sede pontificia, preceduto da Carlo II d'Angiò con la croce". Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella.

Foto 7: Mattia Preti, “Celestino V prende possesso della sede pontificia, preceduto da Carlo II d’Angiò con la croce”. Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella (da Napoli Sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7).

Autentici capolavori di arte medievale sono gli affreschi delle cappelle Leonessa e Pipino, dislocate alle estremità opposte del transetto. La Cappella Leonessa, all’estremità settentrionale, preserva ancora oggi buona parte del ciclo di affreschi, eseguito intorno alla metà del Trecento, al tempo della prima ristrutturazione dell’edificio. Gli affreschi che rivestono le pareti perimetrali sono divisi in due fasce sovrapposte: quella inferiore, caratterizzata da una successione di tondi con busti di santi (foto 8); e quella superiore, ove sono raffigurate “Storie di San Martino”.

Foto: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, Cappella Leonessa, tondo con busto della Maddalena.

Foto 8: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, Cappella Leonessa, tondo con busto della Maddalena.

Il cielo stellato che orna le lunette della volta a crociera accoglie, invece, tondi recanti le effigi dei Dottori della Chiesa e di Santi, ognuna delle quali è affiancata da angeli.

Sul braccio meridionale si apre invece la cappella Pipino, fondata intorno alla metà del Trecento da Giovanni Pipino, conte di Altamura e Minervino Murge, morto nel 1356, da non confondere con l’omonimo fondatore della chiesa. Le pareti perimetrali presentano un ciclo di affreschi con “Storie della vita di Cristo” di grande qualità stilistica.

Lungo il braccio meridionale del transetto, tra la prima e la seconda cappella, compare l’effigie della “Madonna dell’Umiltà”, eseguita verso la fine del Trecento (foto 9).

Foto 9: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, "Madonna dell'Umiltà".

Foto 9: Napoli, chiesa di San Pietro a Maiella, “Madonna dell’Umiltà”.

Sul piano architettonico, di grande interesse è il campanile a cinque piani sormontati da una cuspide piramidale (foto 3). La struttura sembra riprodurre, nei suoi elementi essenziali, il campanile della cattedrale di Lucera (http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basilica_cattedrale_di_Santa_Maria_Assunta_%28Lucera%29). A tal riguardo, è interessante notare che lo stesso fondatore di San Pietro a Maiella, Giovanni Pipino da Barletta, ebbe da Carlo II d’Angiò l’incarico di sterminare la colonia saracena che l’imperatore Federico II di Svevia insediò proprio a Lucera, la cui cattedrale rappresenta ancora oggi uno dei più integri esempi di architettura gotica angioina. L’edificio fu fondato probabilmente dallo stesso Carlo II d’Angiò.

Proseguendo verso Piazza San Gaetano, sul lato sinistro sorge un monumento di grande importanza architettonica, artistica e letteraria: la cappella Pontano (foto 10). L’edificio – fondato nel 1490 dall’umanista Giovanni Pontano per accogliervi le spoglie della moglie Adriana Sassone, morta proprio in quell’anno – presenta una pianta rettangolare ad aula unica con volta a botte. La cappella preserva al suo interno uno splendido pavimento maiolicato, uno dei pochi databili alla fine del Quattrocento, e la “Madonna con Bambino” affrescata da Francesco Cicino da Caiazzo sulla parete di fondo, al di sopra dell’altare che, nelle intenzioni del Pontano, avrebbe dovuto accogliere la preziosa reliquia del braccio di Tito Livio.

Foto 10: Napoli, cappella Pontano.

Foto 10: Napoli, cappella Pontano.

Le pareti perimetrali in tufo grigio, presentano una decorazione architettonica composta da cornici e lesene con capitelli ionici che suddividono l’intera superficie in una sequenza di riquadri rettangolari che racchiudono le finestre. Ogni finestra, inoltre, è fiancheggiata dalle lapidi commemorative in latino e greco, dettate dallo stesso Pontano. La cappella, che poggia su un alto basamento (o stilobate), dispone anche di una cripta. L’architetto della cappella – malgrado Bernardo De Dominici nelle sue Vite de’ pittori, scultori e architetti napoletani ne abbia attribuito la costruzione ad un certo Andrea Ciccione personaggio più di fantasia che reale – secondo alcuni studiosi, come Roberto Pane, sarebbe stato Fra’ Giocondo da Verona. Lo stesso studioso, attribuì successivamente il progetto a Francesco di Giorgio Martini.

Sullo slargo antistante la cappella prospetta la monumentale facciata della chiesa di Santa Maria Maggiore alla Pietrasanta, ricostruita nel Seicento sul luogo dove sorgeva una basilica paleocristiana fondata nel VI secolo d. C. dal vescovo di Napoli Pomponio, di cui non rimane più alcuna traccia visibile. Il nome deriva dalla presenza, all’interno dell’edificio, di una pietra con una croce incisa, sulla quale fu collocata un’immagine della Vergine. L’elemento di maggiore interesse ai fini del nostro discorso, è sicuramente il campanile (foto 11), databile al Decimo o all’Undicesimo secolo, raro esempio di architettura romanica a Napoli.

Foto 11: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta.

Foto 11: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta.

Questo edificio rappresenta una sorta di palinsesto dell’arte napoletana dall’età romana all’Alto Medioevo, in quanto ricco di elementi di spoglio: colonne (foto 12 e 13); un altare (foto 14); un fregio architettonico (foto 15), e un rocco di colonna (foto 16). Nelle pareti interne dell’arco a tutto sesto sottostante il campanile furono inseriti anche alcuni basoli stradali (foto 17).

Foto 12:  Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, colonna romana.

Foto 12: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, colonna romana.

Foto 13:  Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, colonna romana.

Foto 13: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, colonna romana.

Foto 14: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, altare romano.

Foto 14: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, altare romano.

Foto 15: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, fregio.

Foto 15: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, fregio.

Foto 16: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, rocco di colonna.

Foto 16: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, rocco di colonna.

Foto 17: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, basoli nella parete dell'arco.

Foto 17: Napoli, campanile della Pietrasanta, basoli nella parete dell’arco a tutto sesto.

Dopo alcuni metri, superando l’incrocio con via Nilo e via Atri, si nota un portico in piperno con archi acuti alternati ad aperture a tutto sesto, unica traccia del “Palazzo dell’Imperatore” o di “Filippo d’Angiò” (foto 18). Di questo palazzo, fatto edificare da Filippo d’Angiò al tempo del suo matrimonio con Caterina di Valois, figlia dell’Imperatore d’Oriente Baldovino II, restano oltre al portico anche il prezioso portale in marmo, ornato con lo stemma della dinastia reale angioina (foto 19). Per coloro che vogliano approfondire l’argomento, al termine dell’articolo vi è una breve bibliografia.

Foto 18: Napoli, palazzo "dell'Imperatore" o di "Filippo d'Angiò", portico.

Foto 18: Napoli, palazzo “dell’Imperatore” o di “Filippo d’Angiò”, portico.

Foto 19: Napoli, palazzo "dell'Imperatore" o "di Filippo d'Angiò", portale.

Foto 19: Napoli, palazzo “dell’Imperatore” o “di Filippo d’Angiò”, portale.

PAOLO GRAVINA.

BIBLIOGRAFIA MINIMA:

V. REGINA, Napoli antica. Una splendida passeggiata tra i monumenti, le chiese, i palazzi, le strade, i luoghi perduti e le leggende popolari del centro antico di una città ricca di storia e di cultura, Roma 1994, pp. 124 – 134.

Napoli sacra. Guida alle chiese della città, Vol. 7, Napoli (2010).

C. BRUZELIUS, Le pietre di Napoli. L’architettura religiosa nell’Italia angioina (1266 – 1343), Roma 2005, pp. 191 – 193.